Mindful Eating Made Easy

Mindful Eating Made Easy - Tips for Mindful Eating

Set Anti-goals to Prevent Being Overwhelmed

We’ve all been trained in creating S.M.A.R.T goals, and if you have been following me, you know that S.M.A.R.T goals aren’t always helpful.  Sometimes being too specific distracts you from identifying and refining your deeper intention. Yep, you’ve been there, and you want to keep your goals simple because simple goals...
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Six Steps to Use the Thought Compass for Business

The heart of mindful eating is developing the ability to listen to your own inner wisdom. This is typically done in meditation by being quiet, slowing down and noticing what arises for you. In business, there are big benefits that come from engaging in regular reflection. But because...
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What is the difference between a CDE and a CDCES?

Healthcare professionals are unaware that diabetes educators, myself included, have had a change in their credentials. The term CDE now signifies a Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist. While this is a bit of a mouthful, the name change better captures what a CDE (or should I say,...
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You Can’t See Disordered Eating

Identifying disordered eating isn’t as simple as asking if a person ate this or didn’t eat that. Identifying disordered eating requires us to look at both the motivation, fears, and behaviors surrounding food. The followig examples of eating disorder screening questions will give you a sense of how...
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Uncovering Intention: How OEQs can help

Creating a connection with your clients is easy when they share their deeper desires. It’s lovely when our job as educators and coaches are straight forward yet, what do we do when the client isn’t able to tell us what is wrong or what they want to work...
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The Bad, The Good, and the Not Effective.

Open-ended questions are a way to obtain information from a client that prevents a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ response. For example, “Did you eat breakfast?” isn’t an open-ended question but “What did you have for breakfast?” is a better-phased question and in MI, using OEQ’s whenever possible is the...
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When Politics and Professions Collide

The Weight-neutral Self-assessment offers four categories starting with weight-centered, moving to a weight-neutral stance, expanding to weight-inclusive, and ending with a weight-liberated view. Many professionals may incorrectly assume that the last category, weight-liberated is the same as Health At Every Size, HAES. Health At Every Size is identified...
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Working with Disordered Eating in a Weight-neutral Way

Many professionals are shocked to learn that research estimates that up to 40% of people with type 2 diabetes have disordered eating patterns and even more suffer from chronic dieting. How can you, as a weight-neutral professional assist them to create peace with food and with elevated blood...
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A Self-assessment Tool to Help You Step Out of Diet Culture

Being nonjudgmental allows you, the professionals, to see the charlatan and separate fact from fiction. You know that the latest health fads lack the necessary research to prove that its effective. The persuasive argument, promising results, are hard to resist if your client believes that it fixes what...
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My Resolution is Offering Weight-neutral Diabetes Care!

Its that time of year when clients come to see you, energized to change. As a weight-neutral educator, how do you navigate the annual desire to lose weight? The following is a fictitious dialog using Motivational Interviewing to illustrate how to remain nonjudgmental when your clients want to...
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The Weight-neutral Self-assessment: A tool to help you explore your own views on weight and weight-loss

It was more than five years ago that I sat across from Mary at lunch. We had snuck out from the Food Nutrition Expo Conference to have lunch at Legal Seafood. Our view of Boston harbor on that warm October day seemed to frame our shared passion for...
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Counseling Activity — “NICE PANTS!”

Many people are unaware of all the decisions in making a food choice. I created the “Nice Pants” activity, from Core Concepts of Mindful Eating to help clients understand food, eating, and choices aren’t really simple.  Many clients are unaware of the endless number of decisions they make...
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Connecting Eating To Our Experience – PNU Tool

Mindful Eating provides a professional with a unique set of tools. These are not the tools of knowledge, facts, or data, but the information from our direct experience. This embodied experience is powerful to introduce in a counseling session. One of my most beloved counseling tools is asking...
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Resisting What You Can’t See

“Privilege” is a word you’ll hear often in social justice spaces including the non-dieting Health At Every Size community. Yet, what is privilege and why does this conversation seem to instantly create resistance? In this article, we are going to explore the concept of privilege and how it...
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Unpacking Emily, the Anti-Anti-diet, Dietitian

On social media, a dietitian posted she could no longer be an “anti-diet dietitian.”  Her post from the WN4DC Professional Facebook group received more than 50 comments which affirmed how challenging it is to let go of diet culture. This quarter’s theme is about resistance which presents an...
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Facing an Overwhelming Opportunity – How to use Motivational Interviewing in a Counseling Setting

Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Facing An Overwhelming Opportunity Speaking from personal experience, I felt overwhelmed when I began to get serious about Motivational Interviewing (MI). The topic gave me energy and encouraged me with all the possibilities. I just knew this was my future. I was immediately hooked...
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Navigating Food Choices with Diabetes – MI (Motivational Interviewing) in Action

Counseling Scenario Client: “Can I eat this with diabetes?” [Notice the question is asking for permission.] Professional: “You are bright and able, what do you think?” [This question is affirming the client’s ability and encouraging autonomy. ] Client: “Yes, because it is a low carb choice.” [Notice the...
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Two Favorite Counseling Tools

Two tools I use in my counseling practice are the Hunger Fullness scale and The Thought Compass. Recently, I had some clients who wanted to explore their diabetes care and use these two tools. The Hunger and Fullness Scale The Hunger and Fullness scale, from Discover Mindful Eating...
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