Category

Mindful Eating
We’ve all been trained in creating S.M.A.R.T goals, and if you have been following me, you know that S.M.A.R.T goals aren’t always helpful.  Sometimes being too specific distracts you from identifying and refining your deeper intention. Yep, you’ve been there, and you want to keep your goals simple because simple goals provide you with a sense of freedom...
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The heart of mindful eating is developing the ability to listen to your own inner wisdom. This is typically done in meditation by being quiet, slowing down and noticing what arises for you. In business, there are big benefits that come from engaging in regular reflection. But because we can’t expect our clients to sit...
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Healthcare professionals are unaware that diabetes educators, myself included, have had a change in their credentials. The term CDE now signifies a Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist. While this is a bit of a mouthful, the name change better captures what a CDE (or should I say, CDCES) does! We CARE!  Let’s unpack what...
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Identifying disordered eating isn’t as simple as asking if a person ate this or didn’t eat that. Identifying disordered eating requires us to look at both the motivation, fears, and behaviors surrounding food. The followig examples of eating disorder screening questions will give you a sense of how disordered eating is identified.  These questions were taken...
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Creating a connection with your clients is easy when they share their deeper desires. It’s lovely when our job as educators and coaches are straight forward yet, what do we do when the client isn’t able to tell us what is wrong or what they want to work on? In this issue, we will continue...
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Open-ended questions are a way to obtain information from a client that prevents a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ response. For example, “Did you eat breakfast?” isn’t an open-ended question but “What did you have for breakfast?” is a better-phased question and in MI, using OEQ’s whenever possible is the preferred form of inquiry.  Asking closed-ended questions...
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The Weight-neutral Self-assessment offers four categories starting with weight-centered, moving to a weight-neutral stance, expanding to weight-inclusive, and ending with a weight-liberated view. Many professionals may incorrectly assume that the last category, weight-liberated is the same as Health At Every Size, HAES. Health At Every Size is identified with many things ranging from the non-dieting...
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Many professionals are shocked to learn that research estimates that up to 40% of people with type 2 diabetes have disordered eating patterns and even more suffer from chronic dieting. How can you, as a weight-neutral professional assist them to create peace with food and with elevated blood sugars? Using Motivational Interviewing, can help you...
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Being nonjudgmental allows you, the professionals, to see the charlatan and separate fact from fiction. You know that the latest health fads lack the necessary research to prove that its effective. The persuasive argument, promising results, are hard to resist if your client believes that it fixes what ails them. Etiquette prevents you from saying,...
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Its that time of year when clients come to see you, energized to change. As a weight-neutral educator, how do you navigate the annual desire to lose weight? The following is a fictitious dialog using Motivational Interviewing to illustrate how to remain nonjudgmental when your clients want to lose weight. Client: “It’s the New Year,...
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